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wal-mart

Wal Mart, Ethical Issue

Ethical Issue's at Wal Mart
Anonymous Writer

Wal-Mart Stores Inc receives a lot of negative publicity from media and news organizations. I worked in the Marketing Department for one year; I saw the truth and lies within the organization. The one visible unethical procedure was favoritism. I saw it more and more as time went on. The problem with favoritism at Wal-Mart is that it's obscured deep within their corporate culture. The top-executives will disagree, but the truth still remains that the company utilizes favoritism on a daily basis. The main offense is during the promotion period, they avoid female managers, employees with degrees, and employees that are labeled as non-Wal-Mart people. What is a non-Wal-Mart person? It is an employee that did not spend their entire carrier working there, not part of a company niche, has an education or seeking, supports a union, and voices opinions that differ from company vision. Any of the following would label the employee as a non-Wal-Mart person and hurt their chances for promotion. In this manuscript, I will examine the ethical issue, my personal values that were in conflict, potential outcomes, and consequences to the company.

Ethical Issue

The ethical issue is favoritism in the work place. The people involved were the Department Managers and the General Manager of the organization, more specifically during the promotion period. For example, a job for a Front -End Supervisor position has been posted, two employees sign-up for an interview. The first employee called subordinate A, has an M.B.A, fifteen years experience as a manager in the retail industry, and has been working for Wal-Mart Stores Inc, for two years. Subordinate B, has a 9th grade education, no experience in management or retail prior to Wal-Mart, and has been working for the company for one year and has a poor attendance record. They both received the same rating on their ninety day evaluation, who does the manager pick for the position? The answer is subordinate B. Subordinate B got the job, because his kids play with the General Manager's kids at school. I have seen this often during my employment at Wal-Mart.

Conflict of Values

Wal-Mart's operational strategies in regards to promotion, conflict with my personal values. I don't believe in giving someone a job because they are friends of yours. I think this type of behavior is unethical and should be avoided. Managers are behavior role models to other employees. The circumstances that were mentioned earlier caused a lot of employees to become disgruntled. It became apparent from all levels of the store that performance meant nothing and it was who you knew that mattered.

Outcomes and Consequences

The outcome of this unethical behavior is lawsuits against the company. Even with record lawsuits world-wide, the company continued to show favoritism during the promotion period. Wal-Mart has an unimaginable amount of lawsuits pending. The news paper USA Today said,

    By its own count, Wal-Mart was sued 4,851 times last year - or nearly once every two hours, every day of the year. Juries decide a case in which Wal-Mart is a defendant about six times every business day, usually in favor of the Bentonville, Ark., and retail giant. Wal-Mart lawyers list about 9,400 open cases. No one keeps a comprehensive list of all the nation's litigation, but legal analysts believe that Wal-Mart is sued more often than any American entity except the U.S. government, which the Justice Department estimates was sued more than 7,500 times last year. Dozens of lawyers across the United States now specialize in suing Wal-Mart; many share documents and other information via the Internet. (USA Today, 2005)

Unethical behavior will catch up to you in business. Wal-Mart managers should understand this, but they don't follow it. In the corporate level of the company, it seemed this type of behavior was not visible, but at the store level it was.

The consequences to the parties involved were different. The General Manager still to this day utilize favoritism within the work place. The department managers have little choice, but to take the employees he wants for the position. It is a general understanding that you must know someone to get promoted within this organization. Because of this unethical behavior, I have left the company to be a manager else where, due to favoritism at Wal Mart.

In conclusion, Wal-Mart must reduce the amount of favoritism during the company's promotion process. Favoritism seems to be deep within their corporate culture. It may take several years to reduce this form of unethical behavior at Wal Mart. In this manuscript, I have examined the ethical issue that I was exposed to, my personal values that were in conflict during my employment, potential outcomes of the company using unethical behavior, and consequences to the company in the future to come.

Published by Richard Publishing. Copyright, 2005 Richardpublishing@yahoo.com richardpublishing.com

No part of this work may be reproduced of transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system without permission from Richard Publishing. For more information on other publications, please visit richardpublishing.com

Reference:
www.nfsi.org

  ©Copyright 2005. Richard Publishing